Andy Bing, one of the founders of Loch Duart visits Moxons (www.moxonsfreshfish.com), one of London’s leading fishmongers to demonstrate the art of filleting a Loch Duart salmon.

See the video here:-

Read the instructions below:-

Today we are preparing some lovely fresh Loch Duart salmon in Moxons fishmongers in East Dulwich, one of the finest fishmongers in the UK.

In order to fillet a salmon properly you will need: a scaler, a long slightly serrated knife and some small pliers. I would always advise using a metal glove when filleting a fish at home, for your protection and safety.

Andy Bing, one of the founders of Loch Duart visits Moxons, one of London’s leading fishmongers to demonstrate the art of filleting a Loch Duart salmon.

If you want to serve ‘skin on’, you have to remove the scales. Using the scaler, work backwards against the scales and they will fly off. It does make quite a lot of mess but there are a lot of nutrients between the skin and the flesh, so worth doing the extra work to remove the scales rather than lose the skin.

Andy Bing, one of the founders of Loch Duart visits Moxons, one of London’s leading fishmongers to demonstrate the art of filleting a Loch Duart salmon.

Now that the salmon is ready for filleting, we will remove the head. To save as much of the meat of the salmon as possible when removing the head, we cut upwards. Turn the salmon and make the same cut

Andy Bing, one of the founders of Loch Duart visits Moxons, one of London’s leading fishmongers to demonstrate the art of filleting a Loch Duart salmon.

Next we remove the spine. Open the belly cavity and line the knife up against the spine and cut half way through the fish. You will have to cut firmly and patiently, as you are cutting through the ribs. If you point the knife at a slight angle towards the spine this will leave as much flesh on the fillet as possible. Work along towards the tail, once we have finished the cut put the top fillet to one side and continue removing the spine. This is the most challenging part of filleting. You need to be very careful not to cut into the fillet, and you don’t want to come up through the spine and injure yourself – so take your time and be careful. Using the same technique – slightly angle the knife towards to spine and cut through the ribs. Keep your hand clear, as far away from the cutting blade as possible. The tail will come off with the spine.

Andy Bing, one of the founders of Loch Duart visits Moxons, one of London’s leading fishmongers to demonstrate the art of filleting a Loch Duart salmon.

Trimming the belly bones is the next task. You can see the ends of the belly bones, gently lift these so you can get the knife underneath, cutting away from yourself, they should come away quite easily. Then we can cut away the fins, gently cut a small strip away from front to back for a clean edge, repeat these steps on both fillets, making sure to remove both the top and belly fins.

Andy Bing, one of the founders of Loch Duart visits Moxons, one of London’s leading fishmongers to demonstrate the art of filleting a Loch Duart salmon.

Our last task is to remove the pin bones. There are 22 in total, going into the fillet. Using the small pliers, starting from the shoulder end feel your way along and gently, but firmly, pull each bone out. You will notice that I am working at an angle away from the tail end, this is to make it easier to remove the bones.

Andy Bing, one of the founders of Loch Duart visits Moxons, one of London’s leading fishmongers to demonstrate the art of filleting a Loch Duart salmon.

So there we are – skin on, boneless Loch Duart salmon – ready for cooking.